American Psychological Association Ethics

August 17, 2016


American Psychological

Thomas F. Nagy received his doctorate from the University of Illinois at Champaign–Urbana in 1972. He is currently in independent practice in Palo Alto, California, and is a staff psychologist at the Stanford Center for Integrative Medicine, Stanford, California. He also is an adjunct assistant clinical professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, and teaches a seminar on ethical and legal issues for the psychology postdoctoral students in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

For the past 35 years Dr. Nagy's nonclinical professional activities have focused on ethical issues for psychologists. In addition to giving annual workshops and presentations, he has served as chair of the Illinois Psychological Association Ethics Committee (1982–1986), was a member of the APA Ethics Committee (1985–1987), served on and chaired the APA Ethics Committee Task Force that revised the Ethical Principles of Psychologists (1986–1992), was a member of the California Psychological Association Ethics Committee (1988–1993), and is currently a member of the Ethics Committee of Stanford University Hospital and other professional associations. He was an oral examiner for the California Licensing Board for 10 years and has participated in forensic work as an expert witness and consultant to attorneys for many years.

Dr. Nagy provides psychological services and ethical consultation to psychologists, attorneys, educators, and consumers. He is a fellow of APA's Divisions 29 (Psychotherapy) and 42 (Independent Practice) and is also a fellow of the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. He is also a recipient of the Illinois Psychological Association's Special Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Profession of Psychology (1986).

Dr. Nagy authored Ethics in Plain English: An Illustrative Casebook for Psychologists (two editions) and coauthored Ethics for Psychologists: A Commentary on the APA Ethics Code (APA, 1994). He lives in Stanford, California, with his wife, Kären, where he does wood turning, plays the piano and bass guitar, plays squash, studies astronomy, and spends countless wondrous hours learning about the things that really matter from his grandchild Elise.


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Source: www.apa.org

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